North American Protein Degradation Congress 2021 | Kisaco Research

North American Protein Degradation Congress

Helping you create clinically applicable degraders to the entire proteome

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VIRTUAL CONGRESS | EST TIMEZONE
16-24 February, 2021

Get a sneak peek of what we have planned for you this February! Click the link below to find out.

“The interaction and idea exchange between principle investigators from academia and the pharmaceutical industry at this conference was of such a high intensity and quality which I have not experienced before.”

Marcus Groettrup, Professor, University of Konstanz
4
days
25+
industry leading speakers
20+
live presentations
15+
interactive sessions
6
free webinars

Why Attend

The targeted protein degradation field is expanding, gone are the days of simple proof of concept…. We now have LYTACs, AUTACs and ATTECs as well as numerous PROTAC and Molecular Glue companies with millions of dollars worth of investment. C4 netted $182.4 million in IPO, and Nurix and Kymera closed funding with $120 million and $102 million apiece. With several start-ups launching, including Lycia and Amphista therapeutics, investment in this area is booming, and it’s not slowing down.

There are currently over 85 degraders being considered at various stages of development, both preclinical and clinical, as well as in discovery. However, key questions are yet to be answered:

  • How will degrader research translate in the clinic?
  • Why are we still struggling with oral bioavailability?
  • How can we effectively validate novel targets and degrade ‘undruggable’ targets of interest?
  • What can be learned from the new, emerging degrader strategies that are emerging?

Once again bringing together leaders from pharma, biotech and academia as well as innovative service providers, the North American Protein Degradation Congress is back to give you the full picture from molecular biology right the way up to the latest in medicinal chemistry and clinical data.

Learn to create clinically applicable degraders to the entire proteome at the digital North American Protein Degradation Congress 2021.

Pharma & Biotechs

Emerging Biotechs

Founder, Chief Scientific Officer, CEO, Chief Technology Officer

Academic & Research Institutes

Professor - Cell Biology, Research Fellow - Chemoproteomics, Director - Biochemistry

Service Providers

Equipment Manufacturers (Analysis, HTS), CRO/ CMO, Reagents, Delivery/ Computational Providers

4 DAYS OF EXPERT CONTENT

DAY 1 - FEB 16TH

Applying degraders in a clinical setting

Learn how to make clinically applicable degraders and understand what considerations are important for your internal programmes with sessions on:

  • In vivo oral bioavailability
  • Degraders in oncology and beyond
  • Factors affecting SAR and PKPD relationships
  • DMPK and in vivo properties to make drug-like degraders

DAY 2 - FEB 17TH

Degradation via molecular glues and degrading undruggable targets

Discover how to drug the “undruggable” and create novel molecular glues by tuning in to sessions including:

  • Phenotypic screening and implementation of rational strategy to search for molecular glues
  • Using chemoproteomic platforms for covalent ligand discovery
  • The power of induced proximity for “undruggable targets”
  • Decreasing the risk of the high hanging fruit

DAY 3 - FEB 23RD

Exploring next generation technologies and strategies

Employ the latest technologies to find ligands to your protein of interest and study ternary complex formation after hearing case studies on:

  • Use of quality computational modeling tools and reversable covalency
  • Use of DNA encoded libraries to find chemical probes
  • Mapping the degradable kinome to develop degraders
  • How to navigate your IP strategy

DAY 4 - FEB 24TH

Emerging degraders

Get the latest on emerging platforms and expansion of degrader strategies with presentations on:

  • Inhibiting De-ubiquitinating Enzymes
  • Exploting the endosome/lysosome pathway for LYTACs
  • Optical control of degraders using PHOTACs

2020 Speakers

 

Amit Choudhary

Assistant Professor
Harvard Medical School

Amit grew up in a farmer’s family in India and like the other kids “in the hood”, his early career aspirations included joining the army or becoming a cricketer. Amit’s pre-doctoral studies at the Indian Institute of Science‒Bangalore (IISc) involved the total synthesis of natural products and protein folding studies. He was ranked among top 5 students nationwide in the entrance exams of IITs and IISc. In 2006, he moved to Univ.

Amit Choudhary

Assistant Professor
Harvard Medical School

Amit Choudhary

Assistant Professor
Harvard Medical School

Amit grew up in a farmer’s family in India and like the other kids “in the hood”, his early career aspirations included joining the army or becoming a cricketer. Amit’s pre-doctoral studies at the Indian Institute of Science‒Bangalore (IISc) involved the total synthesis of natural products and protein folding studies. He was ranked among top 5 students nationwide in the entrance exams of IITs and IISc. In 2006, he moved to Univ. of Wisconsin‒Madison to pursue his graduate studies with Prof. Ron Raines. Amit’s doctoral thesis describes the discovery of a force (termed n→π* interactions) that is akin to the hydrogen bond in its quantum mechanical origin and widespread prevalence in biomolecules.

Amit got interested in infectious disease and diabetes on observing a rampant prevalence of tuberculosis-triggered diabetes in many Indian families, including his own. In 2011, Amit was elected as a Harvard Junior Fellow and hosted by Prof. Stuart Schreiber at the Broad Institute. Here, he decided to shift his research focus from quantum mechanical interactions to infectious disease and diabetes. In 2015, he was appointed as an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and he also holds appointments at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital and the Broad Institute. The efforts of Amit’s group have been recognized by Burroughs Wellcome Fund’s Career Award at the Scientific InterfaceNIH Director’s Transformative Research AwardDARPA’s SAFE GENES awardVilcek Prize for Creative Promise, and Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation’s Innovation Award.

 

Anthony Partridge

Senior Principle Scientist
Merck

Dr. Anthony Partridge is a Senior Principal Scientist at MSD Singapore where he leads programs in the early discovery space.  Previously, he was Senior Director of Biology at Pharmaron Beijing where he led a team focused on assay development/validation, screening, and built a world-class compound management facility.  As an In Vitro Pharmacology Capability Lead at Merck, he pioneered collaborative efforts with pharmacology-based CRO partners. Prior to this, he was a Senior Scientist in the Pharmacology group at Merck Montreal.  Dr.

Anthony Partridge

Senior Principle Scientist
Merck

Anthony Partridge

Senior Principle Scientist
Merck

Dr. Anthony Partridge is a Senior Principal Scientist at MSD Singapore where he leads programs in the early discovery space.  Previously, he was Senior Director of Biology at Pharmaron Beijing where he led a team focused on assay development/validation, screening, and built a world-class compound management facility.  As an In Vitro Pharmacology Capability Lead at Merck, he pioneered collaborative efforts with pharmacology-based CRO partners. Prior to this, he was a Senior Scientist in the Pharmacology group at Merck Montreal.  Dr. Partridge began his industry based career at Élan Pharmaceuticals in San Francisco. He received his B.Sc. from the University of Guelph (1998), his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto (2003) and completed post-doctoral training at Scripps/UCSD (2003-2006).

 

Benjamin Ebert

Chair of Medical Oncology
Dana Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Benjamin Ebert is the George P. Canellos, MD, and Jean S. Canellos Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chair of Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and an Institute Member of the Broad Institute.

Benjamin Ebert

Chair of Medical Oncology
Dana Farber Cancer Institute

Benjamin Ebert

Chair of Medical Oncology
Dana Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Benjamin Ebert is the George P. Canellos, MD, and Jean S. Canellos Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chair of Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and an Institute Member of the Broad Institute.

Dr. Ebert is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. He served as President of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. His awards include the Till and McCollough Award from the International Society of Experimental Hematopoiesis, the William Dameshek Prize from the American Society of Hematology, the Meyenburg Prize, and mentoring and teaching awards from Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Ebert received a bachelor's degree from Williams College and a doctorate from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar where he worked with Peter Ratcliffe, who was subsequently awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine. He completed an M.D. from Harvard Medical School, a residency in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, and a fellowship in hematology/oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He was on the faculty of Brigham and Women’s Hospital for 10 years before returning to the Dana-Farber.

 

Carolyn Bertozzi

Professor
Stanford University

Carolyn Bertozzi is the Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H and the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Humanities and Sciences in the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University. She is also an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her research focuses on profiling changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and infection, and exploiting this information for development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

Carolyn Bertozzi

Professor
Stanford University

Carolyn Bertozzi

Professor
Stanford University

Carolyn Bertozzi is the Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H and the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Humanities and Sciences in the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University. She is also an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Her research focuses on profiling changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and infection, and exploiting this information for development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She also has been awarded the Lemelson-MIT Prize, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, the Chemistry for the Future Solvay Prize, among many others.

 

Daniel Nomura

Professor of Chemical Biology
UC Berkeley

Dan Nomura is a professor in the Departments of Chemistry, Molecular and Cell Biology, and Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at UCSF. He is also the director of the Novartis-Berkeley Center for Proteomics and Chemistry Technologies. Dr. Nomura is also an editor for Cell Chemical Biology and Current Protocols in Chemical Biology. He earned his B.A. in Molecular and Cell Biology and Ph.D.

Daniel Nomura

Professor of Chemical Biology
UC Berkeley

Daniel Nomura

Professor of Chemical Biology
UC Berkeley

Dan Nomura is a professor in the Departments of Chemistry, Molecular and Cell Biology, and Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at UCSF. He is also the director of the Novartis-Berkeley Center for Proteomics and Chemistry Technologies. Dr. Nomura is also an editor for Cell Chemical Biology and Current Protocols in Chemical Biology. He earned his B.A. in Molecular and Cell Biology and Ph.D. in Molecular Toxicology with Professor John Casida at UC Berkeley and was a postdoctoral fellow at The Scripps Research Institute in chemical physiology with Professor Ben Cravatt before returning to UC Berkeley as a faculty member in 2011. Among his honors are selection as a Searle Scholar, American Cancer Society Research Scholar Award, the Department of Defense Breakthroughs Award, and the Mark Foundation for Cancer Research INSPIRE award. Research in the Nomura Research Group is focused on reimagining druggability using chemoproteomic platforms to discover new disease therapies. 

 

Daohong Zhou

Professor
University of Florida

Prof. Daohong Zhou is a Professor in the Department of Pharmacodynamics at the College of Pharmacy and a Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the College of Medicine, University of Florida (UF) at Gainesville. He serves as the Associate Director for Translation and Drug Development and the Harry E.

Daohong Zhou

Professor
University of Florida

Daohong Zhou

Professor
University of Florida

Prof. Daohong Zhou is a Professor in the Department of Pharmacodynamics at the College of Pharmacy and a Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the College of Medicine, University of Florida (UF) at Gainesville. He serves as the Associate Director for Translation and Drug Development and the Harry E. Innes Endowed Professor of Cancer Research at the UF Health Cancer Center.  His research has led to the discovery of the first potent and broad-spectrum senolytic agent, ABT263-a dual BCL-Xl and BCL-2 inhibitor, that can selectively kill senescent cells to rejuvenate both prematurely senescent tissue stem cells induced by radiation and these in normally aged mice (Chang J et al. Nat Med, 22: 78-83, 2016). This discovery may lead to new therapeutics for various age-related diseases and the side effects induced by chemotherapy and radiation. More recently, he developed several proteolysis targeting chimeras (PROTACs) that can target Bcl-xl and other proteins of interest for degradation via the ubiquitination and proteasome system. He found that Bcl-xl PROTACs can selectively induce Bcl-xl degradation in senescent cells and various cancer cells but not in platelets, suggesting that Bcl-xl PROTACs have the potential to be developed as a better senolytic and anticancer agent than ABT263 by not causing thrombocytopenia. Using the PROTAC drug development platform, he is developing additional specific antitumor and better senolytic agents (Khan S et al. Nat Med, 25: 1938-1947, 2020; He Y et al. Nat Commun, 11: 1996, 2020).

 

Dirk Trauner

Professor
NYU

Dirk Trauner was born and raised in Linz, Austria, studied biology and chemistry at the University of Vienna, and received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from the Free University, Berlin. He then pursued graduate studies in chemistry under the direction of Prof. Johann Mulzer, with whom he moved to the University of Frankfurt and then back to Vienna where he obtained his Ph.D.

Dirk Trauner

Professor
NYU

Dirk Trauner

Professor
NYU

Dirk Trauner was born and raised in Linz, Austria, studied biology and chemistry at the University of Vienna, and received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from the Free University, Berlin. He then pursued graduate studies in chemistry under the direction of Prof. Johann Mulzer, with whom he moved to the University of Frankfurt and then back to Vienna where he obtained his Ph.D. Following a glorious stint in the Austrian Army, he became a postdoctoral fellow with Prof. Samuel J. Danishefsky at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. After two great years in New York City, Dr. Trauner joined the Department of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, where he rose through the ranks to become an Associate Professor of chemistry (with tenure) and a member of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In 2008, he moved to the University of Munich as a Prfesser of Chemistry and Chemical Genetics. In the Spring of 2017 he returned to the United States as the Janice Cutler Chair in Chemistry at New York University (Department of Chemistry). He is also an Adjunct Professor of Neuroscience at the NYU Langone School of Medicine, a member of the Neuroscience Institute and of the Perlmutter Cancer Center.

 

Fleur Ferguson

Assistant Professor
UCSD

Dr. Ferguson received her M.Sc in Chemistry from Imperial College London, and her Ph.D in Chemistry from the University of Cambridge. She performed her postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Professor Nathanael Gray at Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She is currently and Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at U.C. San Diego.

Fleur Ferguson

Assistant Professor
UCSD

Fleur Ferguson

Assistant Professor
UCSD

Dr. Ferguson received her M.Sc in Chemistry from Imperial College London, and her Ph.D in Chemistry from the University of Cambridge. She performed her postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Professor Nathanael Gray at Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She is currently and Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at U.C. San Diego.

 

Georg Winter

Principal Investigator
CeMM

Georg Winter, PhD, obtained his degree from the Medical University of Vienna, working on elucidating the mechanism of action of anti-neoplastic drugs under the supervision of Prof. Giulio Superti-Furga. He specialized on proteomics- as well as chemical genetics approaches to identify drug resistance mechanisms and synergistic drug combinations. He continued his training in chemical biology, working as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. James Bradner the Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School.

Georg Winter

Principal Investigator
CeMM

Georg Winter

Principal Investigator
CeMM

Georg Winter, PhD, obtained his degree from the Medical University of Vienna, working on elucidating the mechanism of action of anti-neoplastic drugs under the supervision of Prof. Giulio Superti-Furga. He specialized on proteomics- as well as chemical genetics approaches to identify drug resistance mechanisms and synergistic drug combinations. He continued his training in chemical biology, working as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. James Bradner the Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School. Supported by an EMBO fellowship, he innovated the first generalizable pharmacologic solution to in vivo target protein degradation (Winter et al., Science 2015). He was recruited as a CeMM Principal Investigator in June 2016 where his research is now focused on using the unique molecular pharmacology of targeted protein degradation to understand and disrupt fundamental principles of transcription and gene control aberrantly regulated in human cancers. Georg Winter (co-) authored 35 manuscripts including publications in Science, Nature, Nature Chemical Biology, Nature Genetics, Elife and Molecular Cell. His interdisciplinary research lab consists of 6 Postdocs, 4 graduate students and 3 technical assistants trained in molecular biology, organic chemistry and computational biology, and is supported by several national and international grants and fellowships including an ERC Starting Grant. Dr. Winter’s contribution to the field of targeted protein degradation was acknowledged via multiple prices and awards, including the prestigious Eppendorf Award 2019 and the Elisabeth Lutz Award of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

 

Ian Churcher

CSO
Amphista Therapeutics

Ian joined Amphista Therapeutics as Chief Scientific Officer in 2020 where he leads a portfolio of projects focused on the development of next generation approaches to targeted protein degradation. Ian was one of the pioneers of the application of targeted protein degradation to drug discovery as Head of the Protein Degradation Discovery Performance Unit at GSK from 2012 including an extensive collaboration with Prof Craig Crews (Yale).

Ian Churcher

CSO
Amphista Therapeutics

Ian Churcher

CSO
Amphista Therapeutics

Ian joined Amphista Therapeutics as Chief Scientific Officer in 2020 where he leads a portfolio of projects focused on the development of next generation approaches to targeted protein degradation. Ian was one of the pioneers of the application of targeted protein degradation to drug discovery as Head of the Protein Degradation Discovery Performance Unit at GSK from 2012 including an extensive collaboration with Prof Craig Crews (Yale). Ian built a team which demonstrated the viability of the VHL-recruiting PROTAC strategy and advanced a portfolio of projects from early proof of degradation through to clinic-enabling studies. During a career in pharma at Merck & GSK, Ian led a range of discovery projects across many therapy areas from target validation through to lead optimisation and clinical entry as well as a number of applications of novel technology to drug discovery. More recently, Ian was SVP Drug Discovery at artificial intelligence biotech BenevolentAI where his team applied novel AI methods to tackling a series of drug discovery challenges across a portfolio of target identification and chemical optimisation projects.

Ian holds an MA and D.Phil. in Chemistry from the University of Oxford where he was also Visiting Professor in the Department of Chemistry.

 

Jennifer Cyran

Scientific Investigator
GSK

Jenni obtained her BSc in Anatomical Sciences from the University of Manchester.  She then joined GlaxoWellcome just prior to it becoming GlaxoSmithKline.  Jenni has spent most of her career in the field of high throughput cellular assay development and joined the world of protein degradation in 2016.

Jennifer Cyran

Scientific Investigator
GSK

Jennifer Cyran

Scientific Investigator
GSK

Jenni obtained her BSc in Anatomical Sciences from the University of Manchester.  She then joined GlaxoWellcome just prior to it becoming GlaxoSmithKline.  Jenni has spent most of her career in the field of high throughput cellular assay development and joined the world of protein degradation in 2016.

 

Kathryn Eldridge

Partner & Attorney
Kilburn & Strode

Kathryn Eldridge is a Partner in the Life Sciences and Chemistry group at Kilburn & Strode. She is extremely commercially focussed, and provides her clients (both start-ups and multinational companies) with  a bespoke service which allows them to maximise the value of their Intellectual property.

Kathryn Eldridge

Partner & Attorney
Kilburn & Strode

Kathryn Eldridge

Partner & Attorney
Kilburn & Strode

Kathryn Eldridge is a Partner in the Life Sciences and Chemistry group at Kilburn & Strode. She is extremely commercially focussed, and provides her clients (both start-ups and multinational companies) with  a bespoke service which allows them to maximise the value of their Intellectual property. Kathryn has extensive experience managing global IP portfolios, as well as post-grant proceedings not just in Europe but in major territories such as China, Korea and Japan, allowing her to provide her clients with an effective patenting strategy to efficiently protect their commercial products.

 

Mary Matyskiela

Executive Director of Molecular Biology
Stealth Mode Start-up

Mary Matyskiela is currently Executive Director of Molecular Sciences at a stealth-mode startup in the targeted protein degradation space. Mary received her B.S. in Chemistry from Yale University. She then went on to perform graduate work at the University of California San Francisco studying ubiquitin ligase mechanism, followed by postdoctoral studies at the University of California Berkeley on the architecture of the 26S proteasome.

Mary Matyskiela

Executive Director of Molecular Biology
Stealth Mode Start-up

Mary Matyskiela

Executive Director of Molecular Biology
Stealth Mode Start-up

Mary Matyskiela is currently Executive Director of Molecular Sciences at a stealth-mode startup in the targeted protein degradation space. Mary received her B.S. in Chemistry from Yale University. She then went on to perform graduate work at the University of California San Francisco studying ubiquitin ligase mechanism, followed by postdoctoral studies at the University of California Berkeley on the architecture of the 26S proteasome. From there, she moved to Celgene/BMS where she spent 6 years developing targeted protein degradation technologies and expanding the horizons of molecular glue targeting through cereblon-CRL4.

 

Matthew Disney

Founder
Expansion Therapeutics

Matthew Disney

Founder
Expansion Therapeutics

Matthew Disney

Founder
Expansion Therapeutics
 

Michelle Arkin

Professor
UCSF

Michelle's lab develops innovative approaches to screen for chemical tools and drug leads, using biophysical approaches like fragment-based drug discovery and biological approaches including high-content imaging with primary cells and organisms. Our goal is to demonstrate 'druggability' of new target classes and to use our compounds to discover new targets for drug discovery. Areas of interest include protein-protein interactions, allosteric and scaffolding sites in enzymes, and orphan and neglected diseases.

Michelle Arkin

Professor
UCSF

Michelle Arkin

Professor
UCSF

Michelle's lab develops innovative approaches to screen for chemical tools and drug leads, using biophysical approaches like fragment-based drug discovery and biological approaches including high-content imaging with primary cells and organisms. Our goal is to demonstrate 'druggability' of new target classes and to use our compounds to discover new targets for drug discovery. Areas of interest include protein-protein interactions, allosteric and scaffolding sites in enzymes, and orphan and neglected diseases. Michelle is co-Director of the Small Molecule Discovery Center, a collaborative research facility that includes high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry.

 

Nir London

Professor
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Nir London received his PhD from the Hebrew university in 2011. He joined the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco, as an EMBO post-doc fellow starting in 2012, and joined the Weizmann Institute as a senior scientist in 2015. Dr. London's lab is focused on covalent chemical biology and drug discovery and has developed several technologies for the design of covalent inhibitors. His honors include the Chorev Award by the Israeli Chemical Society, the Dimitris N.

Nir London

Professor
Weizmann Institute

Nir London

Professor
Weizmann Institute

Dr. Nir London received his PhD from the Hebrew university in 2011. He joined the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco, as an EMBO post-doc fellow starting in 2012, and joined the Weizmann Institute as a senior scientist in 2015. Dr. London's lab is focused on covalent chemical biology and drug discovery and has developed several technologies for the design of covalent inhibitors. His honors include the Chorev Award by the Israeli Chemical Society, the Dimitris N. Chorafas Foundation Award, a postdoctoral award from the Program for Breakthrough Biomedical Research. Most recently he also received the Alon fellowship, an award of excellence from the Israel Cancer Association and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation - AACR Career Development Award for Translational Breast Cancer Research.

 

Paola Castaldi

Head of Chemical Biology and Proteomics
AstraZeneca

Paola Castaldi is the Director and global Head of Chemical Biology & Proteomics at AstraZeneca. Her team is focused on supporting drug discovery programs across all therapeutics areas using state of the art technologies with specific emphasis on target identification, target engagement, MoA and off-target determination. Paola has played a critical role to establish a multi-omics and a therapeutic protein degradation platform at AstraZeneca providing both strategic and logistics directions.

Paola Castaldi

Head of Chemical Biology and Proteomics
AstraZeneca

Paola Castaldi

Head of Chemical Biology and Proteomics
AstraZeneca

Paola Castaldi is the Director and global Head of Chemical Biology & Proteomics at AstraZeneca. Her team is focused on supporting drug discovery programs across all therapeutics areas using state of the art technologies with specific emphasis on target identification, target engagement, MoA and off-target determination. Paola has played a critical role to establish a multi-omics and a therapeutic protein degradation platform at AstraZeneca providing both strategic and logistics directions. Before AstraZeneca, Paola was a key contributor of the Chemical Genetics group at Sanofi Oncology, Cambridge, MA with a focus on phenotypic drug discovery projects for the Wnt and KRAS oncogenic pathways. Prior to Sanofi Paola was at Makoto Life Sciences, where she was responsible for the chemistry strategies towards the identification of the PRPK/TPRKB complex as validated biological targets of immunomodulatory drugs that include lenalidomide (Revlimid), pomalidomide (Pomalyst) and thalidomide implicated in multiple myeloma. Paola Castaldi completed her undergraduate studies in pharmaceutical chemistry and received her Laurea (MSc) at University of Padova, Italy. She then went on to conduct graduate research studies at Imperial College London, UK and postdoctoral studies at UCSD and Boston University.

Something people may not know about her:

Paola is a mother of a 7-year-old girl and 9 years old boy and she loves travelling around the world with her family!!

--Paola practices heated power yoga to maintain focus and peace in her “crazy” daily life--

 

Raphael Franzini

Assistant Professor
University of Utah

Raphael Franzini received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Stanford University working in the group of Prof. Eric T. Kool. He then performed postdoctoral research in the group of Prof. Dario Neri at ETH Zürich. In 2015, he was appointed as an assistant professor in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Utah. Research interests include the development of DNA-encoded libraries and their use for identifying chemical probes for NAD+-related targets as well as bioorthogonal chemistry for applications in drug delivery.

Raphael Franzini

Assistant Professor
University of Utah

Raphael Franzini

Assistant Professor
University of Utah

Raphael Franzini received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Stanford University working in the group of Prof. Eric T. Kool. He then performed postdoctoral research in the group of Prof. Dario Neri at ETH Zürich. In 2015, he was appointed as an assistant professor in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Utah. Research interests include the development of DNA-encoded libraries and their use for identifying chemical probes for NAD+-related targets as well as bioorthogonal chemistry for applications in drug delivery.

 

Rhamy Zeid

Director of Target Biology
C4 Therapeutics

Rhamy Zeid leads the target biology group at C4 Therapeutics, a biotech company that is developing a new class of small molecules that direct the machinery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system to selectively degrade disease-relevant proteins for therapeutic benefit. His group uses a chemical biology approach to characterize the mechanistic and phenotypic consequences of targeted protein degraders towards clinical utility. Before joining C4 Therapeutics, Rhamy received his PhD from Harvard Medical School in the laboratory of Dr.

Rhamy Zeid

Director of Target Biology
C4 Therapeutics

Rhamy Zeid

Director of Target Biology
C4 Therapeutics

Rhamy Zeid leads the target biology group at C4 Therapeutics, a biotech company that is developing a new class of small molecules that direct the machinery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system to selectively degrade disease-relevant proteins for therapeutic benefit. His group uses a chemical biology approach to characterize the mechanistic and phenotypic consequences of targeted protein degraders towards clinical utility. Before joining C4 Therapeutics, Rhamy received his PhD from Harvard Medical School in the laboratory of Dr. James Bradner, where his work focused on the characterization and disruption of cis regulatory elements towards therapeutic application. Previously, Rhamy spent time in both pharmaceutical and academic environments as a drug discovery biologist focused on the development of novel therapeutics in oncology.

 

Ryan Potts

Director and Head of Induced Proximity Platform
Amgen

Ryan Potts, Ph.D. obtained his B.S. in Biology from the University of North Carolina and his Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from UT Southwestern in 2007. In 2008 he was awarded the Sara and Frank McKnight junior faculty position at UT Southwestern Medical Center.  During this time his lab focused on answering a long-standing question in cancer biology regarding the cellular function of cancer-testis antigen (CTAs) proteins. In 2011 he was appointed Assistant Professor in the Departments of Physiology, Pharmacology, and Biochemistry at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Ryan Potts

Director and Head of Induced Proximity Platform
Amgen

Ryan Potts

Director and Head of Induced Proximity Platform
Amgen

Ryan Potts, Ph.D. obtained his B.S. in Biology from the University of North Carolina and his Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from UT Southwestern in 2007. In 2008 he was awarded the Sara and Frank McKnight junior faculty position at UT Southwestern Medical Center.  During this time his lab focused on answering a long-standing question in cancer biology regarding the cellular function of cancer-testis antigen (CTAs) proteins. In 2011 he was appointed Assistant Professor in the Departments of Physiology, Pharmacology, and Biochemistry at UT Southwestern Medical Center. His lab’s work defined a function for the enigmatic MAGE gene family in protein regulation through ubiquitination. In 2016 his lab moved to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital where he was an Associate Member in the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. There his lab continued to work on CTAs, with a focus on elucidating the biochemical, cellular, physiological and pathological functions of the MAGE gene family. In 2020 he moved to Amgen, Inc. in Thousand Oaks, California to build a new department called the Induced Proximity Platform (IPP) that is focused on drugging the “undruggable”.

 

Sara Buhrlage

Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Dana Farber Cancer Institute

Sara Buhrlage, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in Dana-Farber’s Cancer Biology Department and Harvard Medical School’s Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology Department. Her research group focuses on the development of first-in-class inhibitors and prototype drugs for deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that can be utilized to pharmacologically validate members of the gene family as new targets for cancer treatment and other diseases.

Sara Buhrlage

Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Dana Farber Cancer Institute

Sara Buhrlage

Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Dana Farber Cancer Institute

Sara Buhrlage, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in Dana-Farber’s Cancer Biology Department and Harvard Medical School’s Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology Department. Her research group focuses on the development of first-in-class inhibitors and prototype drugs for deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that can be utilized to pharmacologically validate members of the gene family as new targets for cancer treatment and other diseases. DUBs have garnered significant attention recently as potential therapeutic targets in the field of oncology due to their removal of degradative ubiquitin marks from cancer causing proteins.

Prior to joining as a faculty member in July 2015, Dr. Buhrlage was a professional track scientist at Dana-Farber in the medicinal chemistry core laboratory. In this role she collaborated with Institute researchers to pharmacologically validate novel targets of disease and study mechanisms of oncogenesis and drug resistance.

Dr. Buhrlage completed a Doctor of Philosophy in organic chemistry in 2008, under the direction of Professor Anna Mapp, PhD, from the University of Michigan, where she successfully designed, synthesized and characterized small molecules that bind the transcriptional co-activator CBP and upregulate transcription when tethered to DNA. Following completion of her Doctor of Philosophy, Dr. Buhrlage trained for two years in medicinal chemistry at the Broad Institute.

 

Shanique Alabi

Crews Lab
Yale University

 Shanique Alabi is a 6th year PhD candidate in the Pharmacology Department at Yale University. She is performing her PhD studies in the lab of Professor Craig Crews. Her work involves studying PROTAC induced degradation of  kinases implicated in cancer. She is also interested in better understanding PROTAC mechanism of action and selectivity.

Shanique Alabi

Crews Lab
Yale University

Shanique Alabi

Crews Lab
Yale University

 Shanique Alabi is a 6th year PhD candidate in the Pharmacology Department at Yale University. She is performing her PhD studies in the lab of Professor Craig Crews. Her work involves studying PROTAC induced degradation of  kinases implicated in cancer. She is also interested in better understanding PROTAC mechanism of action and selectivity.

 

Shaomeng Wang

Professor
University of Michigan

I have been working on the discovery and development of novel small-molecules therapeutics for more than 20 years. One area of my research has been focused on targeting protein-protein interactions which regulate apoptosis, including the PPIs between the anti-death Bcl-2 and pro-death Bcl-2 members, the MDM2-p53 PPI, and the PPI of IAP proteins with Smac. My research in targeting apoptosis has resulted in the discovery and advancement of 8 compounds into Phase I/II clinical development targeting Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, MDM2 and IAP proteins.

Shaomeng Wang

Professor
University of Michigan

Shaomeng Wang

Professor
University of Michigan

I have been working on the discovery and development of novel small-molecules therapeutics for more than 20 years. One area of my research has been focused on targeting protein-protein interactions which regulate apoptosis, including the PPIs between the anti-death Bcl-2 and pro-death Bcl-2 members, the MDM2-p53 PPI, and the PPI of IAP proteins with Smac. My research in targeting apoptosis has resulted in the discovery and advancement of 8 compounds into Phase I/II clinical development targeting Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, MDM2 and IAP proteins. In more recent years, I have expanded my research program to target a number of PPIs, which regulate epigenetics, including histone readers, writers and erasers, and have advanced several classes of compounds into advanced preclinical development. To accomplish our goals of discovering highly optimized compounds suitable for clinical development and rapidly advancing them into clinical development, I have established extensive collaborations with basic scientists, translational scientists and clinical investigators at UMCCC and in other institutions. I have co-founded five UM start-up companies to help us to bring our drugs into clinical development and marketplace. I have published 300+ peer-reviewed papers and an inventor of 50+ issued US patents and hundreds of international patents. I was elected as Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors in 2014 and as Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2019, was induced into Hall of Fame of the Division of Medicinal Chemistry of American Chemical Society in 2020. I was the 2014 University of Michigan Distinguished Innovator.

 

Tasuku Ishida

Visiting Postdoc and Senior Manager, Ciulli Lab
Dundee and Eisai

Tasuku Ishida completed his M.S.(2002) and Ph.D.(2005) at the University of Tokyo supervised by Prof. Shu Kobayashi. After obtained Ph.D. degree, he joined Eisai Co,. Ltd. as a medicinal chemist to develop new chemical entities in neuroscience area. In 2011, he was assigned to H3 Biomedicine Inc. in Massachusetts, US, which is one of Eisai’s subsidiary, as a senior investigator to construct diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) library. After coming back to Japan in 2015, he joined Oncology Business Group as a senior scientist to develop novel cancer therapies.

Tasuku Ishida

Visiting Postdoc and Senior Manager, Ciulli Lab
Dundee and Eisai

Tasuku Ishida

Visiting Postdoc and Senior Manager, Ciulli Lab
Dundee and Eisai

Tasuku Ishida completed his M.S.(2002) and Ph.D.(2005) at the University of Tokyo supervised by Prof. Shu Kobayashi. After obtained Ph.D. degree, he joined Eisai Co,. Ltd. as a medicinal chemist to develop new chemical entities in neuroscience area. In 2011, he was assigned to H3 Biomedicine Inc. in Massachusetts, US, which is one of Eisai’s subsidiary, as a senior investigator to construct diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) library. After coming back to Japan in 2015, he joined Oncology Business Group as a senior scientist to develop novel cancer therapies. In 2019, he moved to the UK for the collaborative project between the Prof. Alessio Ciulli group and Eisai to develop novel types of protein degraders.

 

Xiaozhang Zheng

Senior Director in Chemistry
Kymera Therapeutics

Profile

Accomplished drug discovery leader with twenty years of pharmaceutical industry experience in the discovery and early development of small molecule therapeutics in oncology, inflammation, CNS, and other therapeutic areas. Ability to successfully deliver projects to achieve research and company goals including clinical trials, IND-enabling studies, and partnerships.

Education

Ph.D. , Medicinal Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN 

Xiaozhang Zheng

Senior Director in Chemistry
Kymera Therapeutics

Xiaozhang Zheng

Senior Director in Chemistry
Kymera Therapeutics

Profile

Accomplished drug discovery leader with twenty years of pharmaceutical industry experience in the discovery and early development of small molecule therapeutics in oncology, inflammation, CNS, and other therapeutic areas. Ability to successfully deliver projects to achieve research and company goals including clinical trials, IND-enabling studies, and partnerships.

Education

Ph.D. , Medicinal Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN 

Dissertation: Novel Antithrombotic Compounds: Synthesis, Stereochemistry, and Structure-Activity Relationships of Antiplatelet 3-Carbamoylpiperidines

Patents & Publications

Over 40 published patent applications and 20 US granted patents

37 publications

Testimonials

Previous attending companies

THE VIRTUAL EXPERIENCE

We understand that this year conferences look a little different, and everyone is missing the interactivity that comes with a face-to-face event. That’s why we’ve made room for sessions that encourage networking with your peers. Learn about each of our new sessions:

Breakout Rooms/Debrief Sessions:

  • Informal discussion rooms where you can sit with a coffee and meet other attendees. Discuss the biggest challenges in targeted protein degradation such as oral bioavailability, structure-activity relationships and e3 ligases, as well as collectively debriefing the day’s sessions.

1-2-1 Networking:

  • Use our Meeting Mojo platform to accept and send meeting requests to speakers and attendees. Use this time to establish new relationships with potential clients and collaborator, or just meet up with old friends to discuss the latest!

Panel Discussions:

  • Use the chat and Q&A functions to add your own thoughts to the discussion or ask any questions to our expert panelists. This is a session that is as interactive as you make it- give us your two cents and spur a discussion!

Roundtables:

  • Sign up to roundtables on the most pressing matters in targeted protein degradation. These sessions are hosted by our expert speaker faculty so use this time to ask questions and put forward your own thoughts. We’re all missing face-to-face interaction these days, so make sure your camera is on- don’t be shy!

Town Hall Meeting:

  • An interview with leaders in the field, similar to a panel discussion, but with more structured questioning. Suggest any questions we may have missed using our Q&A function, or if you want to give your own thoughts on a question, use out chat function or raise your hand and come aboard the town hall meeting.

Speed Dating:

  • 5-minute introductory meetings of 2-3 as an opportunity to have that ‘chance meeting’ and get acquainted with your fellow attendees. Feel free to follow up with a 1-2-1 meeting afterwards to continue your discussion!

PLATFORM PREVIEW

PREVIOUS PARTNERS

2021 Agenda

We're thrilled to share that the full program for the North American Protein Degradation Congress 2021 can now be downloaded by putting in your details on the right hand side!

Download Agenda

Become a Sponsor

Kisaco Research provides the much-needed platform on which industry executives can network, connect and learn from each other as well as meet potential industry partners.

Far from the typical ‘meet-and-greet’ exhibition experience, you – as a sponsor or exhibitor – will be positioned as a partner of the event with a focus on the benefits of your product and brand, rather than just a name on an exhibition list.

With our extensive marketing experience and strategy, your partnership with Kisaco Research will grant you a sponsorship package that is an extension and enhancement of your current marketing and branding efforts. We value your ROI and will work with you directly on your specific goals and targets – that’s why we take special care in finding the most relevant end-users to attend, so that your financial and resource investment is smartly allocated.

Find out more by calling us at +44 (0)20 3696 2920 or email us at [email protected].

Degrader Clinic:

  • This event aims to establish a rationale for degrader drug development: What makes a good degrader? What makes a good target? What is the best practice to employ in my programme? These are questions that will be deliberated at the Degrader Clinic 2021
  • Showcase how your technology, assay, computational tool or know how as a CRO can be best-practice in a degrader program
  • We’re offering the chance to moderate roundtables and be part of the discussion to position yourself as a knowledge leader in the industry

Women in Science:

  • Do you have a strong, internal Diversity and Inclusion programme that showcases your dedication to improving opportunities to women in STEM?
  • Partner with us to highlight what your organization is doing to provide the necessary support to women in this area of drug discovery

At our main event:

  • Showcase your expertise as Keynote speaker on our agenda
  • Present the latest from your technology or conduct workshops to demonstrate your offering
  • Host and moderate on roundtable discussions and panels
  • Partner with us for branding and networking opportunities at out virtual events
    • We can facilitate 1-2-1 meetings and introductions to industry leaders
    • Showcase your offerings at virtual booths

Webinars:

  • Do you want to showcase a new technology and promote how this can help the field of targeted degradation?

Conference Packages

Sending Your Team? Group Discounts Available!

Applicable for Primary Market, Service Provider and Industry Rates Only. Not available for Academic or ‘Start-Up’ rates

Book a Team of 3+ - Save an Additional 10% Off
Book a Team of 5+ - Save an Additional 15% Off

If you would like to register a team of 3 or more, please email [email protected] for your discount coupon code before registering. PLEASE NOTE: Discounts cannot be combined with Early Bird Pricing or any other discount or offer. If you have any questions about your registration, please call us on +44 (0)20 3696 2920

We accept the following cards through Stripe:

Ticket price will increase in

Thursday, November 5, 2020 to Friday, December 4, 2020
Super Early Bird - Academics
$899
Super Early Bird ends Friday, December 4th, 2020. Save $400..
Must be a full time academic or healthcare professional
4-day conference pass
Networking opportunities
Sunday, November 3, 2019 to Friday, December 4, 2020
Super Early Bird - Emerging Biotechs
$1499
Early Bird ends Friday, December 4th, 2020. Save $400.
4-day conference pass
Networking opportunities
Companies operating for < 3 years
Thursday, November 5, 2020 to Friday, December 4, 2020
Super Early Bird - Pharma & Biotechs
$1699
Super Early Bird ends Friday, December 4th, 2020. Save $400.
Must have an active drug pipeline
4-day conference pass
Networking opportunities
Thursday, November 5, 2020 to Friday, December 4, 2020
Super Early Bird - Service Providers
$1899
Super Early Bird ends Friday, December 4th, 2020. Save $400.
4-day conference pass
Networking opportunities
To increase your brand presence, contact Chris Stefanov, [email protected]
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